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Cancer in Cascade County: Here’s What You Need to Know

City-County Health

In 2016, 22 percent of U.S. deaths were from cancer, making it the second leading cause of death after heart disease in both men and women. In Montana, cancer is the leading cause of death.

An estimated 1,762,450 cancers will be in diagnosed in 2019 which is more than 4,800 new cases each day. In addition, 606,880 deaths from cancer are expected to occur in the US.

Here are some some things you should know about cancers:

Most Common. According to cancer.org, the most common cancers diagnosed in men are prostate, lung and colorectal cancers. That accounts for 42% of all cases in men, with prostate cancer or nearly one in five new cases. For women, the most common cancers are breast, lung and colorectal. Breast cancer alone accounts for 30% of new cases.

Deaths Rates Declining. The U.S. death rate from cancer is down 27% from its 1991 peak according to the American Cancer Society. Breast cancer death rates shrank 40 percent from 1989 to 2016 among women. Colorectal cancer death rates declined 53 percent from 1970 to 2016 among men and women. This was largely due to early detection and improvements in treatment

Among adults younger than age 55, new cases of colorectal cancer have increased almost 2 percent per year since the mid-1990s. From2012 to 2016, death rates in the poorest counties were twice as high for cervical cancer. Male lung and liver cancers were 40 percent higher, compared with the richest counties. Poverty is also associated with lower rates of routine cancer screening, later stage cancers at diagnosis, and a less likelihood of getting the best treatment.

Prevention. Avoiding tobacco products, maintaining a healthy weight, staying active throughout life, and eating a healthy diet, may greatly reduce a person’s lifetime risk of developing or dying from cancer.

It’s important to get screened. About 80 percent of colorectal cancer could be prevented by colonoscopy screenings. Screening finds and removes polyps and other precancerous growths. Invasive cervical cancer has been almost eliminated by the widespread use of Pap screening.

Breast, cervical and colorectal cancer screenings are available to qualifying men and women at the Cascade City-County Health Department to reduce the incidence, morbidity and mortality of cancer.

The department’s Cancer Screening promotes early detection and helps cover the costs of screenings for eligible and women.

Breast cancer screenings are available for qualifying women ages 40-64; cervical cancer screenings are available to women age 21 and over; and colorectal cancer screenings are available to qualifying men and women ages 50-56 or those younger with a higher risk of colorectal cancer.

To get more information about screening for specific cancers or ways to lower your risk factors, click on the link or call 791-9272 to make an appointment.

City-County Health Department

115 4th Street S, Great Falls, MT 59401

Hours: 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. Monday – Friday

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Cancer in Cascade County: Here’s What You Need to Know
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Cancer in Cascade County: Here’s What You Need to Know

In 2016, 22 percent of U.S. deaths were from cancer, making it the second leading cause of death after heart

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